The Preferred Hospice Difference

The Preferred Hospice Difference

It has been said, "The majority of Americans die in a hospital in pain, hooked up to machines and isolated from their loved ones."

The "good news" is that this is rapidly changing as more people become aware of and utilize the Hospice benefit. Hospice is designed to address all of the concerns expressed by the Attorney General. The palliative approach to care is what separates Hospice from other philosophies of care. Palliative is not curative and therefore requires a certain level of acceptance on the part of the patient and family. While curative care is driven by attempts to abate or slow progression of a disease process, palliative care is directed at the symptoms of the disease that negatively impact the quality of life. Acceptance that the disease is incurable and life limiting allows the patient to focus on the quality of life remaining. The care is delivered in the patient's place of residence by a qualified multidiscipline team and supervised by a Physician.

Hospice empowers the patient to remain at home and reduces the unnecessary hospitalizations. Hospice addresses all symptoms including pain and allows for maximum comfort, care and dignity. Hospice is end-of-life care that allows the patient to contribute to the plan of care and remain with family and friends. The patient and family are both included in the care plan and emotional, spiritual and medical support is given based on the patient's wishes and needs. Trained volunteers offer support and compassion for patients as well as family members.

Hospice regards every day as a gift but acknowledges dying as a normal process. Hospice neither hastens nor postpones death. Hospice provides personalized services and a caring community so that patients and families can be as prepared as possible for the end-of-life experience. Hospice can offer comfort, strength and compassion to every individual as they fulfill life's journey.